How Does Esurance’s Social ROI (On $1.5 Million Spend) Stack Up?

Having saved $1.5 million on airing their commercial (which was hardly even a “commercial”!) after the Super Bowl (versus during the big game), and spending this money on a “prize fund,” Esurance certainly did something innovative, as well as bridged the gap between the offline (TV) and the online (Twitter, YouTube, website), and also reaped some interesting results. The online stats that the ad campaign yielded were disclosed by their agency Leo Burnett earlier this week.

Here’s what they tell us of the prices Esurance paid versus what these results normally cost:

  • Hashtag price: $0.28 per use (based on 5.4 million uses of the #EsuranceSave30 hashtag) versus $? (I couldn’t find any data on this one)



  • Twitter follower: $5.75 per follower (they’ve had 261,000 new followers join the official Esurance Twitter account, yielding an increase of nearly 3,000%) versus the Twitter Promoted Account ad’s “recommended bid” range of $1.50-$2.20 per follower as quoted by Lisa Raehsler in her recent Search Engine Watch article;


  • YouTube view: $4.52 per view (they reported 332,000 views of the Esurance commercial on YouTube) versus $0.045 per view that Matthew Peneycad‘s test buy of YouTube TrueView ads yielded (more on Social Media Today), and the $0.07-$0.08 range that I’ve seen quoted elsewhere.


Within the first hours of the sweepstakes they also had a 12x spike in website visits to the Esurance’s site. But for this one, we are missing some other important pieces of the puzzle (e.g.: the exact number of newly-acquired visitors, and/or the conversion rate at which these visitors turned into Allstate customers) to make any sensible conclusions.

Of course, the above calculation is based on very simplistic math (merely dividing the $1.5 million by the number of results yielded automatically excludes all the other results from the ROI) and limits itself only to the results registered during the campaign (i.e. before the prize is awarded). It does not and cannot (yet) measure the post-campaign effect, or the brand benefit(s). Nonetheless, however, the Esurance case yields some interesting food for thought that marketers may want to keep in mind when putting together their TV-to-social/online initiatives.

What do you make of this? Was this a successful campaign? Would you go the same route had you had the $1.5 million to spend on a marketing campaign? If not, what would you do differently?

Super Bowl 2013 Power Outage: Best Reactions & Lessons to Learn

When the lights turned off over half of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in the middle of SuperBowl XLVII, I Tweeted:

Honestly, I didn’t expect some of the turns this “talk” has ended up taking, and today (one workweek into the reflections on it, and reactions to it) I’d like to bring a compilation of the five articles I’ve found to be most interesting. Here they are (in chronological order):

1. How Advertisers Made The Super Bowl Power Outage Work For Them by Jennifer Rooney of (02/03/2013, 10:13p)

2. 10 Innovative Social Media Newsjacks of the Super Bowl Power Outage by Anum Hussain of HubSpot (02/04/2013, 11:30p)

3. Marketing Lessons From Super Bowl Power Outage by Daniel Rodriguez of Indivly Magic (02/04/2013)

4. Marketing Lessons and Missed Opportunities From Super Bowl XLVII by Julio Fernandez at (02/05/2013, 11:51a)

5. Four Things Corporate IT Can Learn from the Super Bowl Power Outage by Jay Livens of Iron Mountain (02/06/2013)

Have you found some interesting follow-ups on the subject? Please share them through the “Comments” area below. I’d love to read them too.